Recommended Interesting Articles

Articles

Odin and his Brothers: Common Threads of the Odinic Tradition

Odin and his Brothers: Common Threads of the Odinic TraditionStephany, Timothy J.Rochester Institute of Technology (2006)Abstract: Within the Poetic Edda Odin, Lodur (Loki) and Haenir are responsible for the creation of humanity in Nordic mythology. Odin can be seen in an early form as a god of the sky, Loki as a god of fire, and Haenir as a god of water.
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‘God Damn’: The Law and Economics of Monastic Malediction

“God Damn”: The Law and Economics of Monastic MaledictionBy Peter T. LeesonThe Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Vol.30:1 (2012)Abstract: Today monks are known for turning the other cheek, honoring saints, and blessing humanity with brotherly love. But for centuries they were known equally for fulminating their foes, humiliating saints, and casting calamitous curses at persons who crossed them.
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Catalan commerce in the late Middle Ages

Catalan commerce in the late Middle AgesBy Maria Teresa FerrerCatalan Historical Review, Vol.5 (2012)Abstract: This is a summary of the development of Catalan maritime trade (encompassing Catalonia, Mallorca and Valencia) from the 12th to the late 15th century. The local products used for exchanges are studied, including saffron, dried fruit, raisins and figs, coral, wool, glue , tallow and manufactured items like woolen cloth, ceramics from Valencia, crafted hides, glass items, etc.
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Why people medieval were fasting on Fridays

By Danièle CybulskieFasting was a regular part of medieval religious practice, from royalty to peasantry. There were many rules, reasons, and times which dictated when a person should fast, for how long, and whether or not this meant some specific food or nothing at all. Fasting was proscribed as a penance, often as a restricted diet, and as a way to recognize important events in the Christian calendar.
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Medieval Geopolitics: Marxism and Medieval War

By Andrew LathamHow do Marxists deal with medieval geopolitics, and specifically with the dynamics of war in the Middle Ages? I’ll address this question by tackling what I consider to be the best Marxist work on the topic published in the last two decades: Benno Teschke’s extended 2003 study of the relationship between social property relations and geopolitical systems — The Myth of 1648: Class, Geopolitics, and the Making of Modern International Relations.
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